Rathbone Mansions
Historic New Orleans Hotel, Steps From the French Quarter
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Insiders Guide of things to do, eats and drinks in New Orleans

Rathbone Mansions Insiders Guide

With its unique, vibrant history, award winning chefs, craft cocktail bars, and party atmosphere, there's no wonder NOLA is consistently ranked one of the best cities to visit. We've got you covered with insiders' tips on the best places to visit, eat and drink during your stay. Click through our blog for suggestions, current events and truly experience New Orleans like a local.

New Orleans has a unique, vibrant history, award winning chefs, craft cocktails galore, and a low-key, Southern fun atmosphere. There's no wonder NOLA is consistently ranked one of the best US cities to visit.  We've got you covered with tips on locals' favorite spots to check out during your stay. Scroll through our blog for suggestions, current events and truly experience New Orleans like a local.

 

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Three Southern Charmers

This is an invite to the denizens of two lovely Southern cities: Savannah and Charleston. We know that the lifestyle in both places is civilized and gracious. However, if you’re looking to spice things up a bit why not take a trip to The Big Easy.

 

The magic of Savannah as shown in this ad that appeared in AFAR magazine, May/June 2019

The magic of Savannah as shown in this ad that appeared in AFAR magazine, May/June 2019

Savannah, Georgia is only a 641-mile drive to NOLA while Charleston, South Carolina is a 768-mile one. Coming by plane is 1 hr. and 36 minutes for Savannah and slightly longer for Charleston – so we expect to roll out the welcome mat for you any day now.

 

And, since we’ve extended this invitation we want our readers to know as much as possible about both of you. So here goes:

 

SAVANNAH: the oldest city in Georgia

 

This visual appeared in an ad promoting the charm of Savannah, Georgia – known for its live oak trees and antebellum architecture – courtesy of  The Condé Nast Traveler,  February 2019

This visual appeared in an ad promoting the charm of Savannah, Georgia – known for its live oak trees and antebellum architecture – courtesy of The Condé Nast Traveler, February 2019

I became very interested in this town after seeing the 1997 crime film, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil that was based on John Berendt’s 1994 novel of the same name. I thought the movie, which is taken from an event that really happened, was terrific. Over the years I’ve probably watched it about eight times.

 

The story is gripping, but what really caught my eye were the shots of Savannah -- widely known for its quaint historic district, charming bed and breakfasts plus stately oak trees with Spanish moss cascading down. And guess what? Savannah allows Go Cups on its streets with a caveat: the drinks must be under 16 ounces. Another reason folks from Savannah will love NOLA!

 

What’s the story with food? Well, I happen to know that Fried Green Tomatoes are popular in both Savannah and New Orleans so you folks will feel right at home. (The movie Fried Green Tomatoes was shot in Juliette, Georgia or 180 miles from Savannah. It’s nice to keep everything in the family.)

 

CHARLESTON: known as The Holy City

 

A charming Charleston street scene pictured in one of their ads – courtesy of  Southern Living,  February 2019

A charming Charleston street scene pictured in one of their ads – courtesy of Southern Living, February 2019

I did a double take when I read that one. Apparently, this is its official nickname because of its tolerance for all religions and the number of historic churches that Charleston has for its citizens. But hold on: there’s a counter argument that says, “The Holy City has nothing to do with religion. But rather, any city that is worshipped by its inhabitants and envied by the rest of the world, would inevitably become known as The Holy City.”

 

Here’s another version of that – author unknown – that goes: “Dear Lord, look down on those in pity who dwell outside the Holy City.” I rest my case.

 

Aside from pedicabs and horse-drawn carriages, does Charleston and New Orleans have anything else in common? Certainly. It’s two words: food and drink – the more off-the-wall and exotic – the better.

Charleston Carriage rides.jpg

 

Here’s a description I came across, on the web, of a Charleston star chef named Sean Brock. “He serves contemporary Southern fare (bacon-corn bread with pork butter) – the bar can craft a bourbon cocktail such as ‘Turcotte’s Tipple’ with grapefruit shrub, pamplemouse and pink saltwater.”

 

I don’t have the slightest idea what any of this means EXCEPT that if this chef visits New Orleans he’ll feel right at home.

 

DISCLAIMER: This blog is full of wacky facts and figures for which I take no responsibility. Blame the web.

 

Shaun Nelson-Henrick